Domestic Violence Victim Advocate Volunteer Training

DesignHow You Can Help

There are many ways you can help stop domestic violence. One of them is to become a volunteer domestic violence advocate and work directly with victims and their children. Or you may provide important program support which allows others to do direct client service work.

Completing twenty-four hours of interactive training and shadowing will quality you as a confidential domestic violence advocate in the State of Colorado.

Your training will include the dynamics of domestic violence, program policies and procedures, client confidentiality, safety planning, and legal issues. You will shadow S.H.A.R.E., Inc. staff members as they respond to and work with victims over the telephone, in the office and at the safehouse. This will give you the experience and confidence to find your best fit within the program.

Some of the opportunities for volunteer advocates include:

  • Telephone crisis intervention on a 24-hour crisis line.
  • Confidential victim advocacy, assisting with safety planning, information and referral
  • Case management and client services for female victims and their children residing in the safehouse
  • Transporting clients
  • Facilitating educational and recreational activities for children coming from homes with domestic abuse
  • Assisting with support group
  • Providing administrative support in the office
  • Helping with special events and projects, community education and violence prevention activities

Training is free of charge.

  • You must attend all sessions and be available for evening and/or weekend crisis call duty or other volunteer responsibilities.
  • LGBTQ advocates welcome.
  • Bilingual skills (Spanish) are helpful.

How to apply for the volunteer training.
Contact 970-867-4444 extension 26 or extension 23 for an application and training dates.

Who we are
S.H.A.R.E., Inc. has been working in Northeast Colorado since 1981 to help victims and address the causes of domestic violence. We do that by providing crisis intervention followed by individually tailored services for victims and their children which can include a stay in the shelter, support groups, safety planning, restraining orders, court accompaniment, transitional housing, emergency assistance with things like transportation, rent, and food.
Contact 970-867-4444 ext. 26 or 23 for an application.

Colorado: New Domestic Violence Stalking Law Goes Into Effect

A new law aimed at protecting victims of stalking and domestic violence has gone into effect.
Reports of domestic violence – including stalking – have been increasing in Colorado for the last decade.
Last year alone, there were more than 18,000 reports of domestic violence. But, it was a case involving a Colorado Springs woman that prompted the new law.
Police say Janice Nam’s ex-boyfriend shot her in the head last year, seven months after he was convicted of felony stalking but before he was sentenced.

Glen Galloway, police say, was awaiting sentencing when he cut his ankle monitor, killed a man to steal his truck, and broke into Nam’s house and shot her in the head.
“Right now, there’s a gap of six to eight weeks before sentencing after conviction, and unfortunately that was the gap and time period that Janice Nam lost her life,” said Representative Clarice Navarro (R) Pueblo, the sponsor of the bill.

Navarro closed the gap by passing a law that denies bail to anyone convicted of felony stalking or habitual domestic violence.

Instead, they will stay behind bars during the time between their conviction and sentencing.
“The convicted person has all this rage and anger,” says Navarro, “and that’s the perfect time for them to act out and retaliate.”

Complete article

5 Backhanded ‘Compliments’ We Need to Stop Saying to People Who’ve Experienced Sexual Violence

1. ‘You’re So Inspiring!’
Of all backhanded compliments, this one is probably the most common.
I recently participated in a protest that aims to evoke discussion about sexual violence and serve as a way of healing those who have been violated. At the protest, I met someone who said he enjoys participating in the protest because he’s always “inspired” by the bravery of those who have experienced sexual violence.
Immediately, I started panicking. I was planning on talking about my rape on the evening of the march. What if my story was too sad? Not inspiring enough? What if I make people feel bad instead of good about themselves?
Then I reminded myself that I shouldn’t be worried about that. My story is sad – I shouldn’t make it sound more happy or positive than what it is solely to help other people.
I tell my story to heal myself, not to inspire others.
As I’ve written before, people are often expected to talk about their experiences of sexual violence in order to inspire others.
This can be incredibly problematic: Not only do we dehumanize people when we reduce them to sources of “inspiration,” but we also often end up silencing those who want to tell their story but don’t feel that it’s inspiring or positive enough.
If you like being around those who have experienced sexual violence not because you want to support us, but because you want us to inspire you, please rethink your motives.
It’s one thing to be positively moved by someone’s story; it’s another to reduce them to a source of inspiration.
Our value as humans should not depend on how inspiring we are.
Value me on the days I conquer the world, but value me on the days I can’t get out of bed, too. Value me when my story makes you feel positive and comforted, but also when it shakes you to your core and reminds you that the world can be a really cruel place.
Value us not because we inspire you, but because we’re human.
2. ‘You’re Not a Victim – You’re a Survivor!’
I’ve written about labels before. While I focused then on the queer community, some of those ideas apply to nearly all marginalized groups: Self-identification is a powerful and necessary tool in healing and fighting oppression.
And this applies to people who have been sexually assaulted, too: Choosing to label ourselves and our experiences in a certain way can be really empowering.
Some people who have experienced sexual violence use the term “survivor” – and many sexual violence organizations opt to use this term, too, which is why so many well-meaning people use it.
And for many people, it feels empowering to use the term “survivor.” It reminds them that they have overcome a difficult experience.
In many ways, using the term “survivor” to describe those who have experienced sexual violence is powerful and beautiful. But it’s important to remember that some people don’t identify with the term – and it’s crucial we don’t impose that label on them.
I personally understand the appeal of the term “survivor,” but I’ve never identified with the term. On the other hand, I don’t mind using the term “victim” because I was, indeed, the victim of a horrific crime. I’m not ashamed of the fact that a crime was committed against me, simply because it wasn’t my fault.
So when people inadvertently demonize the term “victim,” it makes me – and many others – feel really uncomfortable. It feels like we’re having a label taken away from us, and another label imposed on us.

Full article

Open Position: Bilingual Direct Service Advocate

DesignOPEN POSITION: Bilingual Direct Service Advocate

Part-time Position, 20 hours per week with opportunity for advancement
S.H.A.R.E., Inc. Morgan County Domestic Violence Agency
April 2017

This staff will provide advocacy and assistance for domestic violence victims and their children. Half time, hourly wage, benefits not provided. There is opportunity for advancement.
Responsible for day to day advocacy and outreach to clients at office or shelter. Must complete 18-24 hours of domestic violence advocate training through S.H.A.R.E., Inc., in order to acquire understanding of domestic violence issues, confidentiality, sensitivity to and knowledge of diverse populations and groups.
Ability to multitask and collaborate with other staff members is required. Must have transportation, insurance. Ability to read, write and speak Spanish is required for this half time position.

How to Contact Us
Please submit your resume and references by email to shareinc1981@gmail.com or fax to 970-867-0460. You may mail to P. O. Box 414, Fort Morgan, CO 80701. No phone calls please.

Job Description
This position will provide assistance for domestic violence victims and their children who seek assistance from our agency. Direct Service Advocates provide advocacy, support, information and referrals. At the present time, position is a half time position, hourly wage, benefits not provided. There is opportunity for advancement.

Responsibilities Include:

• Assist with day to day advocacy for outreach and shelter clients and their children, as directed by the Executive Director, and in coordination with other staff.
• Support and assist other staff as needed for provision of direct client services.

Preferred Qualifications:

• High level of understanding of domestic violence and confidentiality of domestic violence advocacy.
• Completion of S.H.A.R.E., Inc. 18-24 hours domestic violence advocate training or previous experience and education
• Excellent written and verbal communication skills, verifiable fluency with computer programs.
• Ability to collaborate well with others
• Self motivated and autonomous
• Must be organized, detail oriented, and flexible. Able to identify and respond to shifting priorities
• Demonstrated sensitivity to and knowledge of issues involved in working with diverse populations and organizations
• Ability to travel within Morgan County. Have a car, insurance, and a valid driver’s license
• Ability to read, write and speak Spanish.

Firearms and Domestic Violence: A Deadly Combination

From the National Center on Protection Orders Full Faith and Credit Newsletter, March 23, 2017

Firearms and Domestic Violence: A Deadly Combination

Currently, there is a significant amount of discussion in the United States surrounding gun violence. Firearms and domestic violence are a lethal mix. Looking at homicides that occurred in 2011, a recent study showed that nearly two-thirds of women killed with guns were killed by their intimate partners. (Citation: Violence Policy Center, When Men Murder Women: An Analysis of 2011 Homicide Data 6, (September 2013) at http://www.vpc.org/studies/wmmw2013.pdf . It is clear from this data that removing guns from domestic abusers saves lives.

It is important for all disciplines to understand the federal firearm laws and their relationship to any state laws. The complexity of firearm legislation and case law make it difficult and confusing to determine what laws apply and to whom. Federal law prohibits abusers who have been convicted of misdemeanor crimes of domestic violence and persons subject to certain protection orders from purchasing or possessing guns and ammunition. Some states have enacted legislation that mirrors the federal firearm prohibitions. Other jurisdictions have adopted broader laws to address issues that the federal law does not address such as including dating relationships and stalking crimes. To assist practitioners, NCPOFFC has compiled a matrix of domestic violence-related firearm prohibitions.

All disciplines that deal with intimate partner violence have a unique responsibility to address the presence and use of weapons to ensure survivor safety. NCPOFFC has created firearms checklists so practitioners can be better prepared to deal with weapons possession. Please click the following link to access the appropriate firearms checklist:

Law enforcement checklist:
This checklist for law enforcement provides information on two classes of persons prohibited under the domestic violence related provisions of the federal Gun Control Act. Those subject to a protection order (18 USC 922 (g)(8)) and those convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence (MCDV) (18 USC 922 (g)(9)) are prohibited from purchasing or possessing firearms. This document also provides tips on seizure and safe return of firearms as well as responding to information requests and incidents of officer-involved domestic violence. It is important for all disciplines to understand the federal firearm laws and their relationship to any state laws

Judges’ checklist:
This checklist for judges provides key information on the federal Gun Control Act provisions prohibiting purchase or possession of firearms by those subject to a protection order (18 USC 922 (g)(8)) or those convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence (MCDV) (18 USC 922 (g)(9)). Detailed information on who is prohibited, as well as surrender, transfer, and return of firearms, and requirements of judicial notification are provided.

Advocates’ checklist:
This checklist provides information for advocates facilitating a discussion with survivors about firearms. It also provides key information on the federal Gun Control Act provisions prohibiting the purchase or possession of firearms by those subject to a protection order (18 USC 922 (g)(8)) or those convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence (MCDV) (18 USC 922 (g)(9)).

Prosecutors’ checklist:
This checklist for prosecutors provides key information on the federal Gun Control Act prohibiting those subject to a protection order (18 USC 922 (g)(8)) or those convicted of a misdemeanor crime of domestic violence (MCDV) (18 USC 922 (g)(9)) from possessing a firearm or ammunition. This tool provides tips from charging decisions to documenting the conviction, as well as facilitating a community response to aid in convicting dangerous abusers.

NCPOFFC staff is available to assist practitioners in understanding both federal and state domestic violence related firearm prohibitions. Please contact NCPOFFC at 800-903-0111 prompt 2, or visit the website to access matrices of state firearm laws, case law, promising practices, and to request technical assistance or training on this issue.

‘Big Little Lies’ Shows That Domestic Abuse Doesn’t Always Look Like You’d Expect

A quick look at any synopsis of Big Little Lies will quickly give you the basic details on each main character — and one important thing to know about Celeste (Nicole Kidman) is that her husband abuses her in the privacy of their own home. Meanwhile, she’s the envy of everyone in Monterey thanks to her lavish mansion, effortless beauty, and the husband who’s oh-so charming in the presence of others. Big Little Lies’ depiction of domestic violence is important for a number of reasons — first and foremost, the issue doesn’t receive nearly enough representation onscreen and everyone’s latest TV obsession has now become a conversation starter. But I also give Big Little Lies major credit for showing that domestic abuse doesn’t always look or sound exactly as we might imagine it would.

The phrase “abused wife” tends to conjure up an image of a woman who cowers in fear and remains completely motionless when her husband hurts her. It’s easy (and understandable) to assume that a domestic violence victim would never dream of saying something like, “are you going to hit me again?” as Celeste does during a tense moment with Perry in the March 12 episode “Push Comes to Shove.” Those types of abuse victims absolutely exist, but so do women like Celeste — and by showing a character who sometimes hits her husband back and deliberately provokes him, viewers are challenged to look at our own preconceived notions about domestic abuse. Read the complete post.

New Hotline Available for Native American Survivors of Domestic and Dating Violence

A hotline is now available to specifically help Native American survivors of domestic and dating violence.

StrongHearts Native Helpline‘s initial service area is Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska.

“One of the problems in Indian Country is there’s a huge lack of services, and there really hasn’t been any efforts to create a database that pulls together all of the resources that are available,” said StrongHearts Assistant Director Lori Jump.

Jump said violence against women is an epidemic in Indian Country.

“Native American women are two times as likely as any other race to experience rape or sexual assault, two and a half times more likely to experience violent crime and five times more likely to be the victim of homicide,” Jump said. “So, we have an incredible need for services in our communities.”

The helpline will connect callers with confidential, culturally appropriate support services. Some of those services are meant to help sort out complicated matters of jurisdiction.

“The ability of Native governments to prosecute is pretty restricted in terms of who they can prosecute, especially when it comes to non-Native perpetrators,” Jump said.

The helpline is available at 1-844-7NATIVE Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Callers outside those hours can connect with the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

StrongHearts is offered by The National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center and the National Domestic Violence Hotline. It receives some funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.