Category Archives: battered women

Domestic Violence Victim Advocate Volunteer Training

How you can help

There are many ways you can help stop domestic violence. One of them is to become a volunteer domestic violence advocate and work directly with victims and their children. Or you may provide important program support which allows others to do direct client service work.

Completing twenty-four hours of interactive training and shadowing will quality you as a confidential domestic violence advocate in the State of Colorado.

Your training will include the dynamics of domestic violence, program policies and procedures, client confidentiality, safety planning, and legal issues. You will shadow S.H.A.R.E., Inc. staff members as they respond to and work with victims over the telephone, in the office and at the safehouse. This will give you the experience and confidence to find your best fit within the program.

Some of the opportunities for volunteer advocates include:

  • Telephone crisis intervention on a 24-hour crisis line.
  • Confidential victim advocacy, assisting with safety planning, information and referral
  • Case management and client services for female victims and their children residing in the safehouse
  • Transporting clients
  • Facilitating educational and recreational activities for children coming from homes with domestic abuse
  • Assisting with support group
  • Providing administrative support in the office
  • Helping with special events and projects, community education and violence prevention activities

Training is free of charge.

You must be 18 years old and have reliable transportation, valid driver’s license and auto insurance.

You must attend all sessions and be available for evening and/or weekend crisis call duty or other volunteer responsibilities.

LGBTQ advocates welcome.

Bilingual skills (Spanish) are helpful.

How to apply for volunteer training.

Contact 970-867-4444 extension 26 or extension 23 for an application and information on the date of the next training.

Who we are
S.H.A.R.E., Inc. has been working in Northeast Colorado since 1981 to help victims and address the causes of domestic violence. We do that by providing crisis intervention followed by individually tailored services for victims and their children which can include a stay in the shelter, support groups, safety planning, restraining orders, court accompaniment, transitional housing, emergency assistance with things like transportation, rent, and food.

Contact 970-867-4444 ext. 26 or 23 for an application.

S.H.A.R.E, Inc. has office in Yuma

S.H.A.R.E., Inc. Domestic Violence Program has opened a local office in Yuma with an advocate available Mondays and Wednesdays from 9 a.m. to noon; one to five p.m. at 910 S. Main Street, second floor, and by appointment by calling the 24-hour crisis line and office telephone 970-867-4444 or toll free 1-877-867-9590.

“Our goal is to provide more immediate access to services for victims in Yuma County through a local office,” said Silvia Castillo, S.H.A.R.E. advocate.

S.H.A.R.E., Inc. is a 501 (c)(3) community-based domestic violence agency providing services to battered women and their children in Morgan County and other areas of Northeast Colorado since 1981. The main office and the shelter are located in Fort Morgan. Multiple services include 24-hour crisis response, emergency shelter, individual advocacy, safety plans, court accompaniment, assistance with protective orders and filing for victim compensation. S.H.A.R.E. serves over 300 adults and children from Northeast Colorado each year. Last year S.H.A.R.E. received 153 crisis counseling calls; 108 adults were provided crisis counseling in person and 60 women and children attended support groups.

There are no nationwide statistics on rates of domestic violence in rural areas versus urban communities, though a number of regional studies have found women in small towns and isolated rural areas experience domestic violence at an equal or higher rate as their urban peers. Those in rural areas have less access to resources and endure more severe physical attacks according to a 2015 report by the National Advisory Committee on Rural Health and Human Services.

Privacy of information given by victims to S.H.A.R.E., Inc. advocates is protected by Colorado law. This includes information clients tell advocates about themselves and their families. It also includes information about whether or not a person is currently or has ever been a client. This is in contrast to government-based victim services such as those provided by an office of a district attorney or law enforcement agency, which are not covered under the privacy statue. Information given to a victim assistant employed by one of these agencies is not confidential and can be shared with others.

The mission of S.H.A.R.E., Inc. is to empower adults and children to live free from domestic violence. We work actively in the community to create awareness, safety and accountability. The ultimate goal of S.H.A.R.E., is the elimination of domestic violence. Toward this end, we focus on community involvement and support, personal empowerment of domestic violence victims, and the well-being and care of children who experience domestic violence.

Volunteer training begins in April

S.H.A.R.E., Inc.
Call for Volunteers

S.H.A.R.E, Inc. Morgan County Domestic Violence Program Volunteer Training will begin on Saturday, April 28th, 2018 at 8:30 am.

– 24 hours of interactive training/shadowing will qualify you as a confidential domestic violence advocate in the State of Colorado.
– Free of charge.
– You must be 18 years old and have reliable transportation, valid driver’s license and auto insurance.
– Must attend all sessions and be available for evening and/or weekend crisis call duty or other volunteer responsibilities.
– LGBTQ advocates welcome.
– Bilingual skills helpful.

Contact 970-867-4444 extension 26, Jody or extension 23, Jan for an application and more information.

Your training will include the dynamics of domestic violence, program policies and procedures, client confidentiality, safety planning, and legal issues. You will shadow S.H.A.R.E., Inc. staff members as they respond to and work with victims over the telephone, in the office and at the safehouse. This will give you the experience and confidence to find your best fit within the program.

Some of the opportunities for volunteer advocates include:

– Telephone crisis intervention on a 24-hour crisis line.
– Confidential victim advocacy, assisting with safety planning, information and referral
– Case management and client services for female victims and their children residing in the safehouse
– Transporting clients
– Facilitating educational and recreational activities for children coming from homes with domestic abuse
– Assisting with support group
– Providing administrative support in the office
– Helping with special events and projects, community education and violence prevention activities

Colorado: New Domestic Violence Stalking Law Goes Into Effect

A new law aimed at protecting victims of stalking and domestic violence has gone into effect.
Reports of domestic violence – including stalking – have been increasing in Colorado for the last decade.
Last year alone, there were more than 18,000 reports of domestic violence. But, it was a case involving a Colorado Springs woman that prompted the new law.
Police say Janice Nam’s ex-boyfriend shot her in the head last year, seven months after he was convicted of felony stalking but before he was sentenced.

Glen Galloway, police say, was awaiting sentencing when he cut his ankle monitor, killed a man to steal his truck, and broke into Nam’s house and shot her in the head.
“Right now, there’s a gap of six to eight weeks before sentencing after conviction, and unfortunately that was the gap and time period that Janice Nam lost her life,” said Representative Clarice Navarro (R) Pueblo, the sponsor of the bill.

Navarro closed the gap by passing a law that denies bail to anyone convicted of felony stalking or habitual domestic violence.

Instead, they will stay behind bars during the time between their conviction and sentencing.
“The convicted person has all this rage and anger,” says Navarro, “and that’s the perfect time for them to act out and retaliate.”

Complete article

New Hotline Available for Native American Survivors of Domestic and Dating Violence

A hotline is now available to specifically help Native American survivors of domestic and dating violence.

StrongHearts Native Helpline‘s initial service area is Oklahoma, Kansas and Nebraska.

“One of the problems in Indian Country is there’s a huge lack of services, and there really hasn’t been any efforts to create a database that pulls together all of the resources that are available,” said StrongHearts Assistant Director Lori Jump.

Jump said violence against women is an epidemic in Indian Country.

“Native American women are two times as likely as any other race to experience rape or sexual assault, two and a half times more likely to experience violent crime and five times more likely to be the victim of homicide,” Jump said. “So, we have an incredible need for services in our communities.”

The helpline will connect callers with confidential, culturally appropriate support services. Some of those services are meant to help sort out complicated matters of jurisdiction.

“The ability of Native governments to prosecute is pretty restricted in terms of who they can prosecute, especially when it comes to non-Native perpetrators,” Jump said.

The helpline is available at 1-844-7NATIVE Monday through Friday, 9 a.m. to 5:30 p.m. Callers outside those hours can connect with the National Domestic Violence Hotline.

StrongHearts is offered by The National Indigenous Women’s Resource Center and the National Domestic Violence Hotline. It receives some funding from the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

 

 

12 Facts That Show How Guns Make Domestic Violence Even Deadlier

A statistical guide to firearms, intimate partner abuse, and the children, parents, and police who become victims, too.

by Kerry Shaw August 22, 2016

The complete article with graphics

This is not just another “guns and domestic violence” article – it is full of statistical information that makes it crystal clear how guns make domestic violence lethal to intimate partners, children, family members, friends, law enforcement, and even bystanders. Please read. – S.H.A.R.E., Inc.

fb graphic 2

fb graphic 1

The Importance of Using Accountable Language

The Importance of Using Accountable Language

by Phyllis B. Frank and Barry Goldstein

This article was conceived because of the frequency with which leaders of our movement and presenters at conferences use unaccountable language in our presentations and proposals, even as they deeply care about ending men’s violence against women and have devoted their lives to helping women partnered with abusive men.

Like all tools of oppression, unaccountable language is conditioned into our psyches, taught and learned as appropriate vocabulary and in socially acceptable sentence structure. Thus, unaccountable language is part of everyday parlance of people acting in complete good faith in trying to end men’s violence against women. We know this is true because as long as we have trained to avoid unaccountable language, we still sometimes make this error, as well. The movement to end domestic violence has not yet made the use of accountable language a priority. We hope this article will encourage all of us in the movement to do so. This is one program we can afford even in tight economic times.

Defining unaccountable language
Unaccountable language refers to the powerful messages embedded in all forms of speech and media that have all of us lapse into sentence structure that obscures perpetrators, minimizes their abuse, and supports blaming victims. One common example is the phrase “an abusive relationship.” The relationship did not hit the woman, but rather it was the abuser, typically a man who is husband or intimate partner, who was abusive. Such statements make the person who committed the offense, invisible. More specifically it is the use of passive language that results in making the perpetrator invisible. For example, a phrase like a woman was raped should be replaced by, “A man raped a woman.” The rape did not just happen, but rather the rapist committed a brutal act. The idea is to focus attention on the person responsible. Accountably speaking we might say a woman was in a relationship with an abuser or he is abusive to his intimate partner. Another example is exposed by the question, “How many women will be raped or assaulted in this year?” Do we ever hear, “How many men will rape or assault this year?”

Other examples of the language of accountability
Once, when discussing accountable language during a staff training, we looked up on the wall to see a bumper sticker that said, “Every 15 seconds a woman is assaulted.” Our objection at the time was not with the accuracy of the information but that the statement failed to focus on the cause of these assaults. “Every 15 seconds a man assaults a woman!” would be an accountable description.

During a dinner conversation, Barry, and his partner, Sharon, were discussing a series of disastrous calamities in their home caused by the builder who seemed to have deliberately sabotaged their house. After hearing about one emergency repair after another, Phyllis said it was the first time she actually understood the true meaning of an “abusive home“, since too often the phrase “abusive home” is misused to invisiblize a man who repeatedly abuses his partner in their home.

The police and media often refer to incidents in which a man brutalizes his wife or girl friend as a “domestic dispute.” This describes a man’s criminal assault as if it were some kind of mutual problem, even-sided engagement, or tame dispute, rather than an act of brutality. When a mugger assaults and robs a cab driver, it is not described as a “fare dispute.”

Unaccountable language hides responsibility
The use of accountable language is not a technicality or merely a play on words, but rather an issue with profound social consequences. The systemic use of unaccountable language minimizes men’s abuse of women, fails to take his abuse seriously, and hides his responsibility for his actions. If we say “a woman was hurt” it seems like it just happened, as if on its own accord, or by accident, and there is nothing to be done about it. If instead we refer to the man who is hurting the woman, this requires assigning responsibility and taking action to stop him from hurting her again and provide consequences for the harm he caused.

Domestic violence is comprised of a wide range of tactics used by men to maintain power and to control their intimate partners The tactics are part of a pattern of coercive actions designed to maintain, what he believes (consciously or not), are his male privileges, to control his significant other. Historically, men were assigned, by social and legal norms, control over wives and families. Today, even though that is no longer legally, and for so many, morally, the case, an “abusive relationship” or “domestic dispute” makes it seem like a communications or relationship problem between the parties. It suggests counseling or therapy as a remedy instead of consequences to hold abusers accountable for abusive, controlling, and/or violent tactics.

Social Consequences of unaccountable language
As a society our constant use of unaccountable language gives still another advantage to abusers. Unaccountable language, embedded in all dominant institutions, including the judicial system, leads police, prosecutors, defense attorneys, and judges in domestic violence custody cases to confidently assume that both parties share equal blame for not getting along. They often tell the parties they are equally responsible for the problems in the relationship and they must start to cooperate, get therapy, or anger management classes. When a mother attempts to protect her children or limit contact with an abusive father, she is routinely blamed for not getting along rather than recognized for what is a normal reaction to a partner’s abuse.

If we are going to end or at least reduce the use of unaccountable language in this society, those of us working in the battered women’s movement must take the lead and must set an example to use accountable language. Politicians often use phrases like “mistakes were made” Instead of saying, “I made a mistake.” We want society to be clear that men ,who abuse and mistreat the women they are partnered with, are responsible for their actions. We are asking presenters and others working to end domestic violence to join us in striving to use accountable language.

Source